Uncategorized

Could there be a new form of light?

Scientists at Imperial College London recently discovered that there could be a new form of light. The scientists suggest that light photons can be bound to a single electron, thus combining both properties. Photo: VINCENZO GIANNINI How are Photons of Light Created? To get right into the technical details, light photons are produced when electrons orbiting the...

Read More

First Map of the Thawed Areas Under the Greenland Ice Sheet

The Greenland Ice Sheet covers roughly 80% of the country, and is over 2,400 kilometers long from top to bottom. Being the second largest ice sheet in the world after the South Pole's Antarctic Ice Sheet, it is a key area to study for insights into climate change. Mapping Greenland Matters Using multiple technologies in harmony, NASA has been able to produce a...

Read More

Propylene oxide and the start of life on Earth

In the post The Truth About the Apollo Lunar Samples we were introduced to the "lefty" and "righty" qualities of amino acids, on earth and in space. We learned why the Apollo Lunar Samples taken decades ago were found to have small quantities of amino acids that paralleled those found on Earth. But we did not explore why the "lefty" orientation of the majority of o...

Read More

Introducing the National Microbiome Initiative

A little over 6 weeks ago the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) announced the creation of the National Microbiome Initiative. The purpose of this initiative is to advance microbiome research to "aid in the development of useful applications in areas such as health care, food production, and environmental restoration" (1). What is a Microbio...

Read More

The Truth About the Apollo Lunar Samples

In October of last year NASA released the findings of a study that examined the Apollo lunar samples taken during the Apollo missions of the late 1960's and early 1970's. Despite the belief that there was no life on the moon, the Apollo mission soil samples taken over four decades ago contained traces of amino acids – the building materials of proteins. At the tim...

Read More

Machine Learning and the Future of Programming

What if you could program a computer without using any coding? What if you could program it the way you might teach your dog to roll over? With a technology called machine learning this has become possible. What is Machine Learning? Machine learning was defined in 1959 by Arthur Samuel, creator of one of the world’s first self-learning programs, as a “field ...

Read More

Integrating NASA Resources into Your Busy Classroom

In these days of high stakes testing and standards adoptions it can be difficult to see space (pun intended) for NASA in your busy curriculum. I promise you that there are ways to bring in NASA resources and not lose your mind. The following are some suggestions for you to consider as you prepare for the next school year. Take Whatever You Need Remember that a...

Read More

Providing Enriching Opportunities for STEM and Beyond

CSUN work on NASA MEI explores how NGSS standards promotes K-12 teacher scientific literacy and advancement of understanding of the principles of global warming and climate change. Over the past year, PIs Susan Belgrad and Norm Herr have worked with educational partners at NASA JPL (David Seidel and Dr. Ota Lutz) to prepare engaging events for K-12 educators and CSU...

Read More

Learning By Doing and Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory

According to many experts, students’ learning is optimized when the students take an active rather than passive role in the learning process. This video blog shows that a formatted chain of activities can make the students’ learning process in-line with Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory of four-stage learning cycle. In addition, several examples of the activ...

Read More

Tale of the Frozen Water Bear

A water bear, or moss piglet or tardigrade, is a tiny animal that lives among mosses, and has a unique ability to survive some of the harshest conditions on earth. They are able to survive extreme temperatures as low as -328 °F and up to 304 °F, freezing and thawing, changes in salinity, lack of water, radiation, lack of oxygen, boiling alcohol, toxic chemicals, a...

Read More